02.04.2015
14:00

Lord’s Tour and MCC Museum

Address:

Lord’s Cricket Ground, St John’s Wood, NW8 8QN

Phone:

020-7616 8500

Website:

www.lords.org

Opening times:

Tours daily April–Sept at 10:00, 12:00 and 14:00; Oct–March at 10:00 and 14:00. Visitors are advised to book ahead. No tours on major match days

How to get there:

Please enter the ground via the Grace Gate in St John’s Wood Road. Lord’s is very close to central London and easy to reach by road, tube and bus. St John’s Wood is the closest tube station, and Warwick Avenue, Marylebone, Edgware Road and Baker Street are within 15 – 25 minutes’ walk. The nearest bus stops are in Wellington Road and Grove End Road.Tube: St John’s Wood (Jubilee), Marylebone 15 minutes walk to the ground.

Entry fee:

Adult £18 Concessions (Over 60s & Student)
£12 Children (aged 5-15) £12
Family (2 adults & 2 children) £49
Group concessions available.

Additional information:

Almost all of tour accessible to disabled visitors. Pub and shop

The guided tour of Lord’s is the easiest way (without a match ticket) to see the spiritual home of English cricket. Many tours are led by passionate members of the MCC (Marylebone Cricket Club), which owns and runs the ground—and is not to be confused with MCCC (Middlesex County Cricket Club), which plays here. The MCC was founded in 1787 at a match played between Middlesex and Essex in Dorset Fields, Marylebone, now Dorset Square. The match was organised by Thomas Lord, who gives his name to today’s cricket ground. The following year, the Club laid down a Code of Laws which it continues to arbitrate and which govern the rules of the game. Since 2000, following an initiative led by former England captains Ted Dexter and Lord Cowdray, the Code also enshrines The Spirit of Cricket.

The tour starts in the Long Room, the ‘Holy of Holies’ at the heart of the members’ pavilion built in 1890. Three large windows look out over the hallowed turf. The Committee Room, surprisingly small, where the Code of Laws are displayed, is decorated with a fine portrait of Lord and other committee members ancient and modern.

Leaving the pavilion, the tour continues with a look at the Real Tennis court built in 1900, replacing the court that was built on the east side of the ground in 1838. Originating in the 13th century, with rules perhaps even more arcane than those of cricket, the game is mentioned by Shakespeare in five of his plays, and has only recently been called ‘Real’ in order to distinguish it from the modern game of Lawn Tennis. Real Tennis is played today in the UK, USA, Australia and France.

The Museum describes and illustrates the origins and history of cricket. Its most famous exhibit is on the first floor: the small urn containing the ‘Ashes’, for which Test Matches between England and Australia are fought. They remain at Lord’s even when Australia wins. Numerous mementoes of the game are displayed; among the collection of cricket bats is one used by W.G. Grace. There is also the oldest known cricket ball, from 1820, used to score 278 runs in an MCC v. Norfolk match; Don Bradman’s cap worn during the 1930s Australian tour; and Shane Warne’s boots from 1997. Another popular curiosity is a stuffed sparrow killed by a fast ball bowled by Jehangir Khan at Lord’s on 3 July 1936.

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Gravatar: MuseumMuseum
13.04.2015
15:31
Update from Lord’s Tour and MCC Museum

Almost all of tour is accessible to disabled visitors. MCC recognises that many people who wish to visit Lord’s may have special requirements, and details of the facilities and services available to our guests, especially those with special needs can be found at www.lords.org/visiting

Visit the most famous cricket ground in the world and go behind the scenes at 'The Home of Cricket'.

Lord’s Tours provide a fascinating insight behind the scenes at the most famous cricket ground in the world.

Led by an expert guide, the tour includes the Grade II* listed Pavilion, legendary Long Room, Dressing Rooms, award winning JP Morgan Media Centre, Real Tennis court, and M.C.C. Museum home to the famous, iconic Ashes Urn.

With over 400 years of cricket history, the M.C.C. Museum houses the finest collection of cricketing art and memorabilia from around the world, and the Ashes Urn, the symbol of England and Australia’s Test match rivalry for 130 years.

The tour includes the legendary Long Room, with its collection of cricketing portraits is regarded as the ‘Holy of Holies’, and is the heart of the members’ pavilion built in 1890. Three large windows look out over the hallowed turf. The Committee Room where the Code of Laws are displayed, is decorated with a fine portrait of Lord and other committee members ancient and modern. The player’s changing rooms with their Honours Boards are hugely popular with visitors from all over the world.

Leaving the pavilion, the tour continues with a look at the Real Tennis court built in 1900, replacing the court that was built on the east side of the ground in 1838. Originating in the 13th century, with rules perhaps even more arcane than those of cricket, the game is mentioned by Shakespeare in five of his plays, and has only recently been called ‘Real’ in order to distinguish it from the modern game of Lawn Tennis. Real Tennis is played today in the UK, USA, Australia and France.

Around the Ground we take in the magical atmosphere of Lord’s and the award winning architecture of the J.P. Morgan Media Centre. Originally built in 1999 for the Cricket World Cup, the JP Morgan Media Centre is truly an innovative and iconic building, housing around 150 journalists on Major Match days. Here you can see where Sky Sports, Test Match Special and the written press report on the game.

The Lord’s shop also offers a wide range of cricket equipment, gifts and souvenirs to remember your day by. Why not try the Lord’s Tavern and enjoy traditional pub food with a discount for Tours Visitors?

Disclaimer
We cannot guarantee that all advertised elements of the Tour route will be accessible at all times. Times of Tours are subject to alteration and are subject to cancellation at short notice. Restrictions apply surrounding match and event days.

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MUSEUMS & GALLERIES OF LONDON

Details below are taken from our Blue Guide Museums and Galleries of London.  This is a 2005 title, here generally updated for website address and opening times, with useful comments from some of the museums themselves.  More recent information is given in Emily Barber's magisterial new Blue Guide London, "Exceptional update to a classic and useful guide to this amazing city" (Amazon reader review).

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