31.03.2015
11:27

Guards Museum

Address:

Wellington Barracks, Birdcage Walk, London SW1E 6HQ

Phone:

020-7414 3428

Website:

www.theguardsmuseum.com

Opening times:

Daily 10:00–16:00 (sometimes closed January)

How to get there:

Tube: St James’s Park

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Additional information:

Shop

The museum of the five regiments of Foot, Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish, and Welsh Guards occupies a series of purpose-built subterranean rooms in the Chapel Square complex of Wellington Barracks. The five regiments named above furnish the troops that can usually be seen on parade, here and in front of Buckingham Palace, at the Changing of the Guard. Along with the cavalry regiments, the Blues and Royals and Queen’s Life Guards, they form the Household Division. This very well-kept museum opened in 1988 and displays a thoroughly annotated collection of uniforms, medals, silverware, weapons, colours, trophies and memorabilia.

At the entrance, a small mannequin wears the tailored uniform of HRH Prince Arthur of Connaught, aged five in 1838, followed by a useful lesson in regimental identification by button spacing, forage cap bands, bearskin plumes and collar tabs. A formidable array of Victoria Cross medals is also presented. Some were among the first ever to be awarded, for the saving of the colours at the Battle of Alma at the start of the Crimean War.

The exhibition then tells the glorious—and occasionally unfortunate—history of the regiments from their establishment in the 17th century up to the present day. An impressive portrait by Sir Peter Lely depicts General George Monck (1608–70), 1st Duke of Albermarle and the first Colonel-in-Chief of the Coldstream Guards, formed under him in 1650 from part of Lord Fairfax’s New Model Army fighting the Commonwealth cause in Scotland. A Dunbar medal from that year, with the head of Oliver Cromwell on one side and Parliament in session on the reverse, was the first medal to be awarded selectively to the army, for their victory against the Scots. Also exhibited here is General Monck’s gold enamelled snuffbox containing a piece of an elm tree planted by Princess Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth I) while a prisoner of her half-sister Mary Tudor. Next to General Monck, who later marched rapidly south with his regiment to help restore Charles II to the throne, is a display on Thomas, Lord Wentworth, who had exiled himself to Bruges with 400 men loyal to the future King Charles II. In 1656, he became the first Colonel of the Royal Regiment of Guards, later called the Grenadier Guards, the most senior of the five foot regiments. The Coldstreams’ reaction can be gauged from their motto: ‘Second to no one’. The oldest of the regiments is in fact the Scots Guards, formed in 1642. Another portrait, attributed to the circle of Marcellus Laroon, shows the three Keppel family children acting in a private theatrical performance, possibly of Farquhar’s The Recruiting Officer, wearing early uniforms of the Coldstream guards.

Displays then relate the role played by the regiments at the Battle of Blenheim, in the War of American Independence, at Waterloo (featuring the major’s colour carried by the 2nd battalion of the First Foot Guards) and in the Crimean War, among other conflicts, and tell of the formation of the Irish and Welsh Guards in 1900 and 1915. Highlights include the bearskin cap worn by the ‘grand old Duke of York’ (George III’s second son Frederick), and the head of Jacob the Goose, who attached himself to a battalion of Coldstream Guards sent to defend a sentry post in Canada, and gave the alarm when the rebels attacked. An honoured regimental mascot, he was eventually run over by a van at the Portman Barracks in 1846.

Particularly fine are the full-dress 19th-century uniforms of the Dukes of Cambridge, presenting an extraordinary array of sash badges, breast stars, garters and medals from different nations around the world. Among these the collar, badge and breast star of the Order of the Annunziata, the Italian equivalent of the Order of the Garter, remain a mystery, there being no mention in the Order’s meticulous records of any Duke of Cambridge. The Order of Shafakat was a women’s Order: the sash badge displayed here was possibly awarded mischievously by the Turkish Sultan to the 2nd Duke’s beautiful wife, the actress Louise Fairbrother, who because of her lowly origins was never created Duchess of Cambridge, but was known instead as ‘Mrs FitzGeorge’. More recent memorabilia include a pair of chaplis, sandals hand-made in Egypt for the late Michael Crichton Stuart, serving in the Long Range Desert Patrol Group that undertook hazardous reconnaissance behind enemy lines in North Africa. On a similar theme are ‘the boots that walked a thousand kilometres’ on the feet of a captain of the Guards making his escape from a POW camp in northern Italy.

31.03.2015
11:24

Grant Museum of Zoology & Comparative Anatomy

Address:

Rockefeller Building, University College London, 21 University Street

Phone:

020-3108 2052

Website:

www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/zoology

Opening times:

Mon–Sat 13:00–17:00 (and other times by appointment)

How to get there:

Tube: Warren St/Euston Square

Entry fee:

Free

Additional information:

For disabled access phone first

On the site of Charles Darwin’s home from 1838–42, the Grant museum occupies one room in the basement of University College’s Department of Biological Sciences. It displays a massed array of animal skeletons and soft-tissue specimens preserved in formalin, and began life as the teaching collection of Robert Grant (1793–1874), the first professor of Comparative Anatomy and Zoology in Britain, at the new University of London founded in 1827. Probably the first person to teach evolutionary zoology in a British university, Grant influenced the thinking of the young Darwin, but later in life refused to accept the advances in his field and died in penniless obscurity.

Over the years the museum has absorbed other university collections and now preserves some 32,000 different specimens, a small but comprehensive selection of which is displayed here in Victorian glass cabinets. On the left of the entrance a small exhibition tells the history of the museum and displays some of Grant’s original collection, including the baculum or penis-bone of a walrus and the dried urino-genitary tract of a duck-billed platypus. Another case contains several rare and superbly delicate glass models of jellyfish, gastropods, sea anemones and cephalopods. They were made in the late 19th century by the Czech father-and-son team, Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, who went on to supply Harvard’s Botanical Museum with more than 4,000 meticulous glass replicas of flowers. To the right, the museum’s prize exhibits are the skeletal remains of various extinct species: some Dodo bones, and one of only seven complete quagga skeletons known to exist. A type of South African zebra, the quagga had been hunted to extinction by the 1870s for its unusual skin. Also here is the skeleton of a thylacine or Tasmanian wolf, a large marsupial carnivore largely exterminated by sheep- and chicken-farmers. A law protecting the species was passed, too late, in 1936, the year that the last-known thylacine died in captivity.

Retaining the shape and layout of a small Victorian teaching museum, the taxonomical arrangement of some of the specimens has been elucidated with modern labelling. The skeleton of the hedgehog-like—though spineless—Madagascan terek, for example, is enlivened by the information that it has more nipples than any other mammal and is capable of feeding 32 young from its 29 teats. Others are formidable sculptural presences in themselves: the twisting skeleton of an anaconda; several massive elephant skulls; a giant tortoise’s shell; the skeletons of an Indian rhino and a dugong or sea cow.

31.03.2015
11:21

Geffrye Museum of the Home

Address:

136 Kingsland Road, Hoxton E2 8EA

Phone:

020-7739 9893

Website:

www.geffrye-museum.org.uk

Opening times:

Tues–Sun 10:00-17:00

How to get there:

Overground: Hoxton Overground (directly behind museum)
Underground: Liverpool Street station, then bus 149 or 242 from Bishopsgate; Old Street station, exit 2, then bus 243

Entry fee:

Free

Additional information:

Café, shop and period gardens (open April – October)

This small museum in Hoxton is a welcome, friendly oasis in the urban environment of the Kingsland Road, which lies mid-way between the old villages of Haggerston and Hoxton (the latter now a hub of the contemporary art scene). Set behind iron railings are the gardens, tall trees and low-lying early 18th-century buildings of the Geffrye almshouses, converted to a museum in 1914. A museum exploring the English, middle-class home from 1600 to the present day, through a succession of period room and garden recreations, the Geffrye is one of London’s hidden treasures.

31.03.2015
11:07

Fulham Palace

Address:

Bishop’s Avenue, SW6 6EA

Phone:

020-7736 3223

Website:

www.fulhampalace.org

Opening times:

Mon-Thu 12:30-14:30, Sun 12:00–17:00

How to get there:

Tube: Putney Bridge

Entry fee:

Free

Close to the river and Bishop’s Park, the site of Fulham Palace remained in the possession of the Bishopric of London from the early 8th century until 1973. The picturesque red-brick Tudor quadrangle that can now be seen on the approach to the museum is the earliest part of the building to survive, although much restored in the 19th century, around the time that the adjoining chapel was designed by William Butterfield in 1866. The museum is situated in the former Bishop’s dining room, in a late 18th-century building, and traces the history of the Bishops of London and Fulham Palace itself with a small collection of pictures, stained glass and archaeological finds.

The monastic botanical gardens founded here were developed in the 17th century by Bishop Compton, who introduced many rare species, some never before grown in Europe. Botanic beds, a herb garden and wisteria walk in the walled kitchen garden can still be seen.

30.03.2015
14:56

Freud Museum

Address:

20 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead, NW3 5SX

Phone:

020-7435 2002

Website:

www.freud.org.uk

Opening times:

Wed–Sun 12:00–17:00

How to get there:

Tube: Finchley Road

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Additional information:

Shop

In June 1938 Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), the father of psychoanalysis, was forced by Nazi oppression to leave his native Vienna. An anglophile, with a son already living in St John’s Wood, he bought this relatively modern (1920s) house on a quiet tree-lined street of Victorian red-brick mansions in an area popular with Jewish refugees. After his death from cancer of the jaw in September 1939, his wife Martha and daughter Anna continued to occupy the house, keeping it much as it had been left by Freud. On Anna’s death in 1982, it was decided to open the house as a museum, which welcomed its first visitors in 1986.

Ground floor

In a sense, Freud himself was the first curator of the museum. In preparation for his arrival, the contents of his Viennese home were rearranged here as accurately as possible by his faithful housekeeper. The main room on the ground floor was his working library, where he completed Moses and Monotheism, began his Outline of Psychoanalysis, and continued to see patients until two months before his death. Along with the famous couch, given to him in fact before his development of the ‘talking cure’, while he was still a research neurologist, the centrepiece of the room is his desk and chair. The latter was purpose-built for Freud’s peculiar reading posture—he liked to study books with one knee slung over a chair arm—by architect friend Felix Augenfeld, with arms designed to double as leg rests. His large desk supports a massed array of Greek, Egyptian, Asian and Chinese statuettes and figurines. These form part of his extensive and important private collection of antiquities, carefully positioned in glass cabinets and in every available space around the room. They include Egyptian gods, goddesses and mummy masks, Bodhisattvas and Chinese buddhas (one a rare walking penitent), as well as Greek and Roman sculpture. (There are no explanatory labels because of the need to maintain the display exactly as it was known to the great man.) A small statue of Athena was the mascot of the family’s emigration to England, sent ahead for safe-keeping to Princess Marie Bonaparte in Paris before they left Vienna. While many of the sculptures are exceptional pieces in themselves, what makes them doubly interesting is their meaning for Freud: as Marina Warner says in the preface to the museum guide, they represent the ‘tools of thought’.

On a table at the foot of the couch, itself covered by a Qashqa’i carpet, is the Freud azmalyk, one of only 12 in existence, a five-sided Turkoman rug woven by the nomadic Tekke tribe to cover the leading camel in a wedding procession. Many of these Oriental furnishings were obtained by Freud’s brother-in-law. The other room on the ground floor contains Anna Freud’s collection of 19th-century Austrian peasant furniture, the most complete of its kind outside Austria: stout wooden bridal chests, wardrobes and cupboards decorated with exuberant floral patterns. Beyond is the gift shop in the loggia, transformed into a conservatory by architect son Ernst Freud, father of Clement and Lucien.

Upper floor

Up the wide staircase from the hall, filled with natural light in a way that put Freud in mind of a palace, the stairwell is hung with screenprints specially commissioned for the museum by Patrick Caulfield, Cornelia Parker, Claes Oldenburg and other contemporary artists. Pride of place on the landing goes to a portrait sketch of Freud made from life by Salvador Dalí in 1938. Nearby, two paintings by the Wolfman (Russian aristocrat Sergei Pankejeff) depict the dream that gave the artist his name, showing wolves perched on the branches of a leafless tree. In celebration of the centenary of the publication of The Interpretation of Dreams (1999), ‘interventions’ in the form of printed excerpts have been positioned at significant points around the house, encouraging visitors to explore some of the major themes of Freud’s work.

Of the three rooms open to visitors on the first floor, the largest is given over to Anna Freud and her own pioneering work in child psychoanalysis. She started the renowned Hampstead Child Therapy courses in 1947, opening a clinic in Maresfield Gardens five years later, now called the Anna Freud Centre. Standing in the corner is her loom, which she herself found to be of great therapeutic value. The other rooms are given over to temporary exhibitions relevant to the Freuds, and two 20-minute videos on a loop: one concerning the history of the house followed by a rare recording of Freud's own declaration of purpose, and the other an intriguing collection of home videos from the Freuds’ days in Vienna, narrated by Anna. The museum still contributes to the advancement of the cause of psychoanalysis through conferences and archival research.

30.03.2015
14:54

Foundling Museum

Address:

40 Brunswick Square, WC1N 1AZ

Phone:

020-7841 3600

Website:

www.foundlingmuseum.org.uk

Opening times:

Tues–Sat 10:00–17:00; Sun 11:00–17:00

How to get there:

Tube: Russell Square/King’s Cross

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Additional information:

Café and shop

The Foundling Museum is a remarkable institution which records the foundation, history and continuing work of the Foundling Hospital, a charitable home for illegitimate children established in 1739 by Captain Thomas Coram (1668–1751). A humble Dorset man, Coram was a master mariner who had arrived back from the American colonies to be appalled by the plight of the abandoned, orphaned and destitute children on the streets of London. In 1739, after 17 years of relentless campaigning among the titled, wealthy and influential, Coram persuaded George II to grant a Royal Charter to open ‘A Hospital for the Maintenance and Education of Exposed and Deserted Young Children’. An entirely secular organisation, the first of its kind, it was funded through private donations and subscription.

History of the Hospital

The Hospital opened in 1741, in temporary premises in Hatton Garden. On its first day it was open for the receipt of children until full, 18 boys and 12 girls being accepted. All Foundling children were baptised on admission. The first child was named Thomas Coram, and the first girl Eunice Coram, after Captain Coram’s wife, who had died in 1740.

In 1742 the foundation stone of the Hospital’s permanent buildings was laid in Lamb’s Conduit Fields, present-day Coram Fields. Consisting of three wings around a courtyard—the west wing for boys, the Governor’s Court Room and a Picture Gallery, the east wing for girls, and a central chapel—the Hospital was designed by Theodore Jacobsen, an amateur architect and one of the Hospital’s governors. The chapel was begun in 1747. In 1749 Handel, who became a Hospital governor, conducted a concert there to raise funds for its completion, for which he composed the Foundling Hospital Anthem. Fundraising musical concerts became a feature of the Hospital’s calendar, with Handel conducting annual performances of the Messiah. A terracotta bust of him by Roubiliac is in the collection.

Further social fundraising events included ticket sales for Ladies’ Breakfasts, and opportunities to visit the Hospital, admire its buildings, inspect the children and view its art collection. The latter was an important component of the Hospital. The ornate Governor’s Court Room and Picture Gallery contained fine paintings and works of art by leading contemporary British artists, principally Hogarth and his circle, presented to the Hospital from 1746, many of which remain in the museum today. In return for their philanthropy, the Hospital offered to artists a means by which to promote the talents of the native school through public exhibition of their work (the Foundling offered the first public exhibition space in the country). A number of artists were elected governors, and these formed a separate committee which met annually, ‘to consider of what further Ornaments may be added to the Hospital’.

Coram, a bluff and forthright man, was ousted from the Board of Governors soon after the Hospital’s foundation. He made frequent visits to the Hospital however, was godfather to over 20 Foundlings, and was buried under the altar of the chapel. In 1926 the Governors decided to move the Hospital to the cleaner air of the country, first to Redhill, then to Berkhamsted. The original building was sadly demolished, but several of the finer rooms were carefully salvaged and re-erected within the Hospital’s new headquarters at 40 Brunswick Square, completed in 1938. Opposite the new building the Hospital’s old site, Coram Fields, became a playground for children. In 1953 the Hospital ceased to operate as a school for abandoned children, and the policy of placing children in foster homes was adopted in its place. The charity was renamed the Thomas Coram Foundation; in 1999 it became Coram Family, its headquarters in the building adjoining the museum. The museum and its collections became a separate museum trust in 1998, and after an extensive renovation programme opened as the Foundling Museum in 2004.

 

The Building and its Exhibits

On the ground floor is the exhibition Coram’s Children, which explains the origins and history of the Foundling Hospital, and the social conditions of 18th-century London. The Hospital originally had official appointment days for receiving children, with desperate queues forming outside the gates with more children than could possibly be accommodated. A ballot method was introduced instead. On reception days mothers drew a ball from a bag, its colour deciding the fate of their child. Careful records were made of each child admitted, as well as identifying keepsakes which could be used to reclaim children. Several of these touching Foundling tokens are on show: metal tags with names, ribbons, buttons, lockets and even a hazelnut shell. Handel’s annotated musical score for the Foundling Hospital Anthem, based on Psalm 41, ‘Blessed is he that Considereth the Poor’ is displayed, as is a modern scale model of the original Hospital building and original admissions registers. The Committee Room was where mothers were interviewed before being submitted for the ballot process. Pictures include 19th-century scenes with charitable themes and Hogarth’s great March to Finchley, the scene set in the Tottenham Court Road in the winter of 1745, where a band of guardsmen is moving off to Finchley before marching north against Bonnie Prince Charlie’s rebels. The King’s Head tavern has been commandeered by the notorious brothel-keeper Mother Douglas. Hogarth sold the picture by lottery; 167 of the unsold 2,000 tickets were donated to the Hospital, which won the picture. Set into panelling above the chimneypiece is George Lambert’s Landscape with Figures, his Hospital presentation picture. The Staircase is the original 18th-century boys’ wing oak staircase, originally fitted with a rail and spikes to stop the boys sliding down. Hung on it are paintings with sentimental and moral subjects; portraits of governors; and Benjamin West’s Christ Presenting a Little Child, the Hospital chapel altarpiece. On the first floor landing is Andrea Casali’s Adoration of the Magi, the 1750 altarpiece which West’s replaced in 1801.

The Picture Gallery was the principal 18th-century visitor attraction. Here important full-length portraits of governors and other Hospital figures hang, principally Hogarth’s Captain Thomas Coram (1740), a masterpiece of British art, which Hogarth presented to the Hospital. Coram is shown seated on a dais, with columns behind, holding the seal of the Hospital’s Royal Charter: the composition is redolent of traditional Baroque pomp, and yet Coram appears wigless and ruddy-cheeked, a direct realism contrary to expected polite decorum. Other portraits include Ramsay’s Dr Richard Mead, the internationally famous physician, scholar and collector, and Hospital governor, with a statue of Hygieia, goddess of health, in the background; Hudson’s Theodore Jacobsen, shown holding architectural plans and elevations of the Hospital; and George II by Shackleton. In the Foyer are seapieces (many Foundlings followed naval careers) including a monochrome preparatory sketch for Copley’s enormous Siege of Gibraltar (Guildhall Art Gallery).

The
Court Room, where the Board of Governors met and where select social entertaining took place, was the most elaborately decorated room in the 18th-century building, carefully reconstructed in 1937. The spectacular Rococo plasterwork was the free gift of the plasterer William Wilton, the marble chimneypiece, by John Devall, was donated by him in 1747, and its marble relief overmantel, Charity, is by Rysbrack. The four large biblical paintings are Hagar and Ishmael by Highmore; The Little Children Brought before Christ by James Wills; The Finding of the Infant Moses in the Bulrushes by Hayman; and Moses Brought before Pharoah’s Daughter by Hogarth, all of them appropriate themes for a charity caring for abandoned children. The landscape roundels between them, set into plasterwork surrounds, were installed in 1751 and show views of London charitable foundations by leading British landscape artists: the Foundling Hospital is by Richard Wilson and the Charterhouse by the 21 year-old Thomas Gainsborough.

The Gerald Coke Handel Collection on the second floor is a scholarly resource with manuscript musical scores and a library. Next door visitors can sit in leather winged armchairs with built-in audio systems which play a selection of Handel’s music (but disappointingly not the Foundling Anthem).

30.03.2015
14:51

Forty Hall & Estate

Address:

Forty Hill, Enfield, Middlesex, EN2 9HA

Phone:

020-8363 8196

Website:

www.fortyhallestate.co.uk

Opening times:

Tue–Fri 11:00–17:00, Sat-Sun 12:00-17:00

How to get there:

Train: Turkey Street (from Liverpool Street) then a 20-min walk
Bus: 191, W10 to Forty Hill roundabout

Entry fee:

Free

Additional information:

Café, open Oct–March 11:00–16:30

This notable Caroline mansion of red brick was built 1629–32 for Sir Nicholas Rainton, a wealthy haberdasher, Lord Mayor of London and President of St Bartholomew’s Hospital. The architect is not known, although a case has been made for Edward Carter, Chief Clerk of the King’s Works, colleague and successor of Inigo Jones as Surveyor-General. The hipped roof is of particular interest, being advanced for its time and an important early example of this popular style. On Rainton’s death in 1646, the estate passed through several owners, being purchased by Major Henry Bowles, MP for Enfield, in 1895. Internal alterations were carried out around this time. In 1951 Forty Hall was sold to Enfield Council by Derek Parker Bowles.

Surrounded by attractive informal gardens, which include one of the most ancient cedars of Lebanon in the country and an avenue of limes planted in the 18th century, the house still appears externally much as it did when built. In the grounds some few remains have been found of Elsyng Palace, a Tudor royal manor and hunting lodge, where in 1547, in the presence of Princess Elizabeth, Edward VI received the news of the death of his father Henry VIII and of his consequent accession.

The Entrance Hall has good Rococo plasterwork of c. 1787, with medallions representing the Seasons. The fine carved panelling on the early 17th-century Hall Screen is an outstanding survival from the original house. The Dining Room and Drawing Room retain their original fireplaces, panelling and plaster ceilings with bold strapwork decoration. In the Rainton Room is a fine portrait of the original owner of the house, ascribed to the great Civil War-era portraitist William Dobson. Of the four rooms on the first floor, two keep their original elaborate plaster ceilings (one of them dated 1629). One of the rooms contains a Childhood Gallery displaying local toys, clothes and cribs from the 19th century to the 1940s. Temporary exhibitions are also mounted here.

30.03.2015
14:47

Florence Nightingale Museum

Address:

St Thomas’s Hospital, 2 Lambeth Palace Road, SE1 7EW

Phone:

020-7620 0374

Website:

www.florence-nightingale.co.uk

Opening times:

Mon–Sun 10:00–17:00

How to get there:

Tube: Waterloo and Westminster

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Additional information:

Shop

Hidden away beneath the modern blocks of St Thomas’s Hospital, this small museum describes the life and work of Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) and preserves a memorial collection of ‘Nightingalia’, formerly the pride of the Matrons of St Thomas’s. The museum opened here in 1989, on the site of the pioneering nursing school that Nightingale founded in 1860. As the ‘lady with the lamp’ who cared for the sick and wounded in the Crimea (1854–56), she became a reluctant legend in her own lifetime. The marble bust which heads the display was one of the very few portraits of herself that she ever allowed to be taken from life, and then only because it had been commissioned by the soldiers who had been her patients. Nightingale’s careful control of her own image also played an important role in securing the political influence that would enable her to contribute to a complete transformation in the status of nursing, eventually providing many women with a new means of achieving economic independence.

Nightingale’s own considerable fortune was provided by the will of her great-uncle Peter, a prominent Whig and supporter of Parliamentary reform. Born during her parents’ three-year honeymoon, she was christened Florence after her birthplace. Her sister, older by one year, was called Parthenope, the Greek name for Naples. To each other, they became Pop and Flo. Some sketches by her sister of the young Nightingale and their family home are shown here. Unusually, their father William educated the girls himself, elucidating the finer points of mathematics, algebra, Euclid, philosophy and statistics. This last proved particularly useful to Nightingale’s improvements in hospital administration. She would eventually be the first female honoured with membership of the Society of Statisticians.

Florence Nightingale regarded her career as a vocation. Aged seventeen, while walking in the garden at home, she experienced a calling from God, and a further adumbration of her purpose in life came during a visit to Kaiserswerth on the Rhine, a Lutheran institution for the help of the poor, founded in 1825. Her decision to become a nurse appalled her family, at a time when the secular side of the profession was best characterised by the likes of Sarah Gamp in Dickens’ Martin Chuzzlewit. When the horrors of the Crimea were reported in the Times, Nightingale gathered together a disparate team of 38 ladies in four days, all prepared to endure the terrible voyage out to the military hospital at Scutari. Three times as many men were dying from disease as from wounds received in battle. Her first order upon arrival was for 200 scrubbing brushes. Nightingale also called upon the services of the ex-chef of the Reform Club, Alexis Soyer, transforming her patients’ diet. Her celebrity upon her return is demonstrated here by a variety of contemporary china figurines cast in her image; her mission by new designs for hospital wards, the foundation of the nursing school and development plans for district nursing and midwifery. Some of the furniture and a harpsichord from her house at 10 South St, Mayfair, from where she orchestrated her campaigns, can be seen. Also displayed are her black bodice and matching skirt from 1859. In that year she self-published Suggestions for Thought to the Searchers after Truth, still in print today. Frequently unwell herself throughout her long life, she remained unmarried and died at her home in 1910, surrounded by a colony of cats. The exhibition concludes with her pet Little Owl called Athena, rescued from the Parthenon and kept in her pocket, now stuffed and mounted in a glass case. It died, much to her distress, the day before she set out for the Crimea.

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES OF LONDON

Details below are taken from our Blue Guide Museums and Galleries of London.  This is a 2005 title, here generally updated for website address and opening times, with useful comments from some of the museums themselves.  More recent information is given in Emily Barber's magisterial new Blue Guide London, "Exceptional update to a classic and useful guide to this amazing city" (Amazon reader review).

FULL LISTING of CURRENT EXHIBITIONS in London from Apollo Magazine »

Emily Barber recommends five major London museums »

Please do share your comments and updates with us via the form below the entry for each museum.

Latest

National Maritime Museum
Wimbledon Windmill Museum
Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum
2 Willow Road (National Trust)
William Morris Gallery
Whitechapel Gallery
Westminster Abbey Museum
Wesley's Chapel
Wellington Arch (English Heritage)
Wallace Collection
Victoria & Albert Museum
Tower Bridge Exhibition
Tower of London (Historic Royal Palaces)
Tate Modern
Tate Britain
Sutton House (National Trust)
Spencer House
Southside House
South London Art Gallery
The Courtauld Institute of Art (Somerset House)
Sir John Soane's Museum
Shakespeare’s Globe
Serpentine Gallery
Science Museum
St Bride’s Crypt Museum
St Bartholomew’s Hospital Museum
Saatchi Gallery
Royal Society of Arts
The Royal Mews
Royal London Hospital Museum
The Faraday Museum
Royal Hospital Chelsea
RCM Museum of Music
Royal Academy of Music Museum
Royal Academy of Arts
Red House (National Trust)
Ranger’s House (English Heritage)
Ragged School Museum
The Queen’s Gallery
Prince Henry’s Room
The Photographers’ Gallery
Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
Osterley Park (National Trust)
Orleans House Gallery
Old Operating Theatre, Museum and Herb Garret
Natural History Museum
National Portrait Gallery
National Gallery
National Army Museum
Musical Museum
World Rugby Museum
Museum of the Order of St John
Museum No. 1 (Royal Botanic Gardens)
Museum of London
Garden Museum
Museum in Docklands (Museum of London)
The Royal Observatory
The Queen's House
Old Royal Naval College
Marianne North Gallery (Royal Botanic Gardens)
Marble Hill House (English Heritage)
Mall Galleries
Lord’s Tour and MCC Museum
London Transport Museum
London Fire Brigade Museum
London Canal Museum
18 Stafford Terrace – The Sambourne Family Home
Library and Museum of Freemasonry
Leighton House
Kingston Museum
Kew Palace (Historic Royal Palaces)
London Museum of Water & Steam
Kenwood House (English Heritage)
Kensington Palace (Historic Royal Palaces)
Keats House
Jewish Museum
Jewel Tower (English Heritage)
Jerwood Space
Imperial War Museum
ICA Institute of Contemporary Arts
Hunterian Museum
Horniman Museum
HMS Belfast (Imperial War Museum)
Hayward Gallery
Handel House Museum
Hampton Court Palace (Historic Royal Palaces)
Ham House (National Trust)
Guildhall Art Gallery
Guards Museum
Grant Museum of Zoology & Comparative Anatomy
Geffrye Museum of the Home
Fulham Palace
Freud Museum
Foundling Museum
Forty Hall & Estate
Florence Nightingale Museum
Firepower: The Royal Artillery Museum
Fenton House (National Trust)
Fashion and Textile Museum
Fan Museum
Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art
Eltham Palace (English Heritage)
Dulwich Picture Gallery
Dr Johnson’s House
Dennis Severs' House
Danson House
Cutty Sark
Contemporary Applied Arts
Chiswick House (English Heritage)
Chelsea Physic Garden
Chartered Insurance Institute Museum
Charles Dickens Museum
Carlyle’s House (National Trust)
Camden Arts Centre
Cabinet War Rooms & Churchill Museum (Imperial War Museum)
Burgh House - The Hampstead Museum
Buckingham Palace
Brunel Engine House
Brunei Gallery SOAS
British Optical Association Museum
The British Museum
The British Library
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Benjamin Franklin House
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Hampton Court Palace (Historic Royal Palaces)
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Museum of London
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Geffrye Museum of the Home
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Lord’s Tour and MCC Museum
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