27.03.2015
14:26

Dennis Severs' House

Address:

18 Folgate Street, London E1 6BX

Phone:

020-7247 4013

Website:

www.dennissevershouse.co.uk

Opening times:

1st and 3rd Sun of each month 14:00–17:00; Mon following the 1st and 3rd Sun 12:00–14:00; Also open on Mon evenings for candlelight viewings (booking essential). Telephone for additional Dec and early Jan openings, when the house is dressed for Christmas

How to get there:

Tube: Liverpool Street

Entry fee:

Admission charge

18 Folgate Street, a 1724 Georgian terrace house in the heart of historic Spitalfields, was created by Dennis Severs, an American designer and eccentric enthusiast for times past, who lived in the house with no electricity and few concessions to the modern world until his death in 1999. With period decoration and furnishings, many bought from local markets, the rooms are presented at different historical periods as they would have appeared when inhabited by successive generations of the fictional Jervis family. Historically, Spitalfields was an area dominated by Huguenot silk weavers and this was the Jervis family trade when they first occupied the house in the early 18th century. Visitors progress through the centuries from the Kitchen and Front Parlour, to the late 18th-century prosperity of the elegant Drawing Room and to the collapse of the silk industry and the cold, damp poverty of the Victorian attics. An evening candlelight tour is the most atmospheric. To best savour the series of tableaux vivants, visitors are asked to maintain silence (and can be asked to leave if they do not). Sounds and smells hint at the family near at hand. Floorboards creak, clocks tick, a bird flutters in its cage, carriages bowl past on the cobbled street outside, candles flicker and warm fires crackle and hiss. Throughout the house the emphasis is on evocation of atmosphere and mood rather than pinpoint historical accuracy, and a visit is an unforgettable experience.

The Huguenot Contribution
Throughout the 16th and 17th centuries large numbers of Huguenot (French Calvinist) refugees found a safe haven in England, exiles from religious persecution. Many came to escape the French Wars of Religion and the 1572 Massacre of St Bartholomew, and numbers peaked sharply following the 1685 Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, which removed Protestant freedom of worship. Huguenot communities were established in East Anglia, Kent, and along the south coast, as well as London, which was the main draw. By 1700 Spitalfields, Leicester Fields and Soho had become distinct Huguenot areas. Spitalfields, being beyond the jurisdiction of the Weavers’ Company in the City, became increasingly identified with the silk industry.

Many Huguenots were prosperous international merchants who were able to escape with their goods intact. Their investments in London banking and insurance houses (several Huguenots were foundation subscribers to the Bank of England) contributed substantially to the capital’s wealth, whilst marriage alliances created powerful trading and financial dynasties. A great many more Huguenots were skilled craftsmen, whose expertise and innovatory techniques had a profound impact on London’s luxury trades. An early key figure was Daniel Marot, a pupil of Louis XIV’s maître ornemaniste, who was in England in the 1690s, working for William and Mary at Hampton Court. His interior designs, with grotesque ornament, mirrors, lacquer work, massed displays of porcelain and elaborate upholstery, provided rich sources for contemporary craftspeople. Important carvers and gilders included the Pelletier family, who provided furniture for Kensington Palace and Hampton Court, and a leading upholsterer was Francis Lapiere, based, with others, in Pall Mall. Many of London’s leading 18th-century goldsmiths, such as Paul Crespin, Paul de Lamerie and the Rococo master Nicholas Sprimont, were second-generation Huguenots, while native masters such as George Wickes and Thomas Heming were Huguenot-trained.

27.03.2015
14:22

Danson House

Address:

Danson Park, Bexleyheath, DA6 8HL

Phone:

020-8303 6699

Website:

www.dansonhouse.org.uk

Opening times:

Open to the public from Apr-Oct, although available to hire throughout the year.

How to get there:

Station: Bexleyheath (from London Bridge or Charing Cross), then a 10-minute walk

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Danson House is an important mid-18th-century Palladian villa, recently rescued from dereliction. Set in a municipal park in suburban southeast London, it was designed from 1763–67 by Robert Taylor, architect of the Bank of the England, for Sir John Boyd, a director of the East India Company and heir to West Indian sugar plantations. The last private owner was Mr Alfred Bean, a railway entrepreneur, who sold it to Bexley Borough Council in 1921. It was taken on a long lease from the Council by English Heritage in 1995.

The architect William Chambers was involved in designing the interior, notably the marble fireplaces. In a dramatic twist to the story of the restoration of the house, the fireplaces were discovered awaiting shipment abroad, after being stolen from the semi-derelict building. They were replaced in the correct rooms thanks to a series of seven detailed mid-19th-century watercolours of the interior, done by Sarah Jane Johnson, daughter of the second owner. These paintings contributed substantially to the accuracy of the ten-year English Heritage restoration project (architects Purcell Miller Tritton). The house is now managed by the The Bexley Heritage Trust, which is undertaking the complete restoration of the service areas, kitchen, attic storey and grounds, to the original plans of the 18th-century landscape designer Nathaniel Richmond.

The restored rooms include the Dining Room, where two large gilded mirrors decorated with griffins have been recessed into the walls at each end; the Library, with verdigris wall decoration and, in pride of place, a rare late 18th-century chamber organ made by George England of Sheffield; the Octagonal Salon, where the starburst plaster ceiling has been repaired and re-gilded and—the highlight of a tour—the Grand Dining Room, complete with 19 panels painted by the French artist Charles Pavillon in 1766. Carefully restored to their original position and appearance after decades of neglect, they depict festive scenes from mythology, including the fable of Pomona and her ageing lover Vertumnus. They were commissioned by John Boyd to celebrate his recent marriage to the much younger Catherine Chapone.

27.03.2015
14:18

Cutty Sark

Address:

King William Walk, Greenwich, SE10 9HT

Phone:

020-8858 3445

Website:

www.rmg.co.uk/cuttysark

Opening times:

Daily 10:00–17:00

How to get there:

Station: Cutty Sark on DLR

Entry fee:

13.50 (Adults), 7 (children), 11.50 (concession), children under 5 go free

Additional information:

Disabled access to tween deck. Caffé and shop, ship is accessible

The Cutty Sark is the most famous and fastest of the great tea clippers, which raced each other annually to bring back the lucrative new-season China tea crop from the Far East. Now the only tea clipper to survive, she was built by the firm Scott & Linton at their shipyard at Dumbarton, on the Clyde, and launched in 1869. Her name comes from the short shirt of Paisley linen worn by the witch Nannie in Robert Burns’ poem ‘Tam O’Shanter’, who serves as the ship’s figurehead, grasping the tail of Tam’s grey mare in her hand. Elegant and sleek, with a great expanse of sail, the Cutty Sark cost £16,150, is 280ft long, weighs 938 tons and had a maximum crew of 28. At her fastest she covered 368 miles in a day. She worked in the China tea trade between 1870 and 1877, then carried coal from Shanghai to Sydney, wool between Melbourne and New York and, from 1885–95, wool between Australia and London. In 1924 she was restored as a tea clipper by Captain Dowman, and on his death was presented to the Thames Nautical Training College. Exhibited at Greenwich in 1951 as part of the Festival of Britain, she has been in dry dock there ever since, but recent survey work has revealed serious corrosion of her ironwork and an extensive programme of restoration is necessary, funds permitting.

27.03.2015
14:14

Contemporary Applied Arts

Address:

89 Southwark Street, London SE1 0HX

Phone:

020-7620 0086

Website:

www.caa.org.uk

Opening times:

Mon–Sat 10:00–18:00, Sun 11:00-17:00

How to get there:

Tube: Southwark, Borough, Blackfriars, London Bridge

Entry fee:

Free

Founded in 1948 as the Crafts Centre of Great Britain, its aim to support and promote excellent craftwork, Contemporary Applied Arts is the showcase of an association of around 200 professional makers. There is a constant retail display of members’ work including jewellery, metalwork, ceramics, woodwork, textiles, glass and bookbinding, but there are also special exhibitions which focus on innovations in the crafts. It is usually home to the annual exhibition of artists shortlisted for the Jerwood Applied Arts prize.

27.03.2015
14:08

Chiswick House (English Heritage)

Address:

Burlington Lane, Chiswick W4 2RD

Phone:

020-8995 0508

Website:

www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/chiswick-house

Opening times:

Sun-Wed 10:00-18:00

How to get there:

Station: Chiswick (from Clapham Junction)

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Additional information:

Ground floor disabled access; phone first for access to main floor. Shop. Café nearby in park

Chiswick House is the greatest architectural statement of Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington (1694–1753), the early 18th-century ‘Apollo of the Arts’ and the chief promoter of Palladianism. Heavily influenced by the architecture of ancient Rome and that of Palladio, which he had witnessed on his tours of Italy (returning from the second trip in 1719), as well as the architecture of the great Inigo Jones, Burlington conceived Chiswick as an embodiment of his architectural ideals. The jewel-like villa, with ornate interiors and Jonesian ceilings painted by Burlington’s protégé William Kent, was originally attached to the estate’s Jacobean mansion and was used as a temple of the arts, an intellectual retreat where Burlington displayed his fine pictures and sculptures and entertained friends, including the poet Alexander Pope. On Burlington’s death the estate passed via his daughter to Lord Hartington, later 4th Duke of Devonshire, and in 1788, under the 5th Duke, the Jacobean house was demolished and wings added to the villa north and south. Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries the house was a centre of English social life. In 1809 Charles James Fox died here and Edward VII, as Prince of Wales, spent time here, as did the Tsars of Russia. The Chiswick estate remained with the Dukes of Devonshire until 1929. In 1956–57 the Ministry of Works restored the villa, demolished the wings which were obscuring Burlington’s design, but retained the Link Building which had attached the villa to the old Jacobean house. Burlington’s pictures and much of the furniture designed for the house by Kent have either been dispersed or are in the Devonshire collection at Chatsworth. Several loans from the latter, however, and the odd chance purchase of important pieces original to the house, give a sense of the villa as it was in its 1730s heyday.

The approach to the house is from the gateway on Burlington Lane, which opens on to a courtyard enclosed by a box hedge. Burlington’s extraordinary creation, built in 1727–29, is directly ahead. Palladio’s Villa Rotonda is usually cited as the main inspirational source, but in fact the villa is Burlington’s own unique interpretation of several. The central octagonal dome is flanked by four chimney stacks in the shape of obelisks, while an elaborate double staircase rises to the first floor entrance, under a Corinthian portico of great richness, the carving crisp and pure. At the foot of the staircase, to either side, are statues by J.M. Rysbrack (c. 1730) of Burlington’s architectural heroes, Palladio and Inigo Jones.

The Interior

Visitors enter at ground level through the doors under the staircase. The symmetrical room layout, around the central octagon, or Lower Tribune, echoes the arrangement on the upper floor, but these basement rooms are of a deliberate austerity, rich grandeur retained for the principal rooms above. Burlington’s private rooms and library were down here, but now the rooms are given over to an architectural introduction to the house and gardens. The Library occupied three rooms, through which access is gained to the lower floor of the Link Building and, beyond it, the Summer Parlour with its fine ceiling. Below the Lower Tribune is the octagonal wine cellar. A concealed spiral staircase leads up to the main floor. A sequence of nine rooms of a studied, intellectual magnificence is arranged around the octagonal domed Tribune, or Saloon, with light flooding in from its Diocletian windows, its walls punctuated by four pedimented doorways, based on Jones designs. Classical busts sit on gilded brackets and above them hang large pictures from Burlington’s collection at Burlington House, Piccadilly, but which were brought to Chiswick in 1733. They include Charles I and his Family, after van Dyck; Liberality and Modesty, after Veronese; Louis XIII and Anne of Austria, by Poussin’s master Ferdinand Elle; and Kneller’s The Moroccan Ambassador (1684), an equestrian portrait of Mohammed Ohadu, famous for his displays of horsemanship in Hyde Park. The Gallery runs the full length of the garden front and is one of the most important rooms in the house. A tripartite space with a rectangular, apsed centre, with flanking circular and octagonal cabinets, it is a rigorously controlled architectural enfilade. The actual dimensions are small but an effect of grandeur is achieved through the skilfully judged proportions and the richly carved and ornamented surfaces, decorated in white and gold. The ceiling painting is a copy of Veronese’s Defence of Smyrna, attributed to Sebastiano Ricci, who also decorated Burlington House (now the Royal Academy. The surrounding ceiling panels, within compartments with ornamentation derived from Jones, are by Kent. The magnificent carved and gilded marble-topped tables, designed by Kent, were made for the house in 1730 and returned in 1996. The Red Velvet Room was originally filled with paintings. Another rich compartmented ceiling, again based on Jones, has Kent’s Mercury Presiding over the Arts in the centre, surrounded by signs of the zodiac. The marble chimneypieces are based on Jones designs and the ornate, gilded overmantels contain paintings by Ricci: Bacchus and Ariadne and Venus and Cupid. The Blue Velvet Room has an elaborate ceiling design with console brackets with Kent’s Architecture in the centre. The carved and gilded pedimented doorways are surmounted by portraits, held by putti, including Inigo Jones by William Dobson and Pope by Kent. The Red Closet beyond it showed prized, smaller scale pictures.

The Gardens

Burlington and Kent’s interior, a fusion of classical, 16th-century Italian and 17th-century Jonesian taste, was augmented by a similarly carefully designed garden. The garden had been evolving from 1716 onwards, but in the early 1730s Kent was brought in to complete for Burlington a Roman suburban retreat. Many of the features can still be seen, including the broad avenue lined with urns and sphinxes, culminating in a semi-circular exedra, originally of myrtle but now of yew, framing busts of Caesar, Pompey and Cicero. Radiating paths once terminated in garden buildings of which the Rustic House still survives. The bridge over the Canal was built by James Wyatt in 1788. At the Canal’s south end is the recently restored Cascade, two triple arched storeys of rough masonry down which water flows. To the southwest extremity of the estate is a tall obelisk, and elsewhere a turfed amphitheatre with a small Ionic temple with an obelisk and a sheet of water in front of it. The gardens at Chiswick are important in marking a departure from the intricate, formal designs of the Baroque age and the introduction of a more natural landscape, with semi-contrived wildernesses and expansive vistas. They are in a neglected state, however, and vandalism has been a significant problem (e.g. the beheading of a sphinx).

The grounds are the responsibility of the local borough council (English Heritage manages the house only), but the two authorities have united in a campaign of restoration, with work due to begin towards the end of 2005.

North of the house is the Inigo Jones Gateway, brought to Chiswick from Beaufort House, Chelsea in 1736, a gift of Sir Hans Sloane and the subject of a poem by Pope:

Passenger: O Gate! how cam’st thou here?
Gate: I was brought from Chelsea last year,
Battered with wind and weather;
Inigo Jones put me together,
Sir Hans Sloane let me alone,
Burlington brought me hither.

27.03.2015
14:01

Chelsea Physic Garden

Address:

66 Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea, SW3 4HS. (Access from the gate on Swan Walk)

Phone:

020-7352 5646

Website:

www.chelseaphysicgarden.co.uk

Opening times:

Apr–Oct 11:00-18:00

How to get there:

Bus: 239 from Victoria

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Additional information:

Disabled entrance at 66 Royal Hospital Road, café and shop

Established in 1673 and first known as the Apothecaries’ Garden, Chelsea Physic Garden first functioned as a training ground for apprentices of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, involved in the cultivation of plants for medicinal use. The ornamental gates on the Embankment once led directly to the river, where the Company’s barge was housed. In 1681 the garden boasted the first heated greenhouse in England, known as the ‘stove’, which attracted the attention of eminent botanists and scientists such as Sir Hans Sloane and John Ray, both keenly interested in the cultivation of rare ‘exotics’. In 1685 John Evelyn visited Chelsea and noted the ‘the tree bearing the Jesuit’s bark’, the source of the expensive anti-malarial quinine. It was also in the 1680s that four cedars of Lebanon were planted, the first in England (the last one died in 1904). One of the trees produced its first cone in 1725, and seeds were distributed widely around the estates of Britain, and also to America. The garden was part of the Manor of Chelsea, which had been purchased by Sloane in 1712. In 1722 Sloane transferred the freehold to the Apothecaries in virtual perpetuity, for an annual rent of £5, for use as a Physic Garden where ‘the power and glory of God in the works of creation’ could be studied. The statue of Sloane, placed at the centre of the garden where its four lawn walks meet, is a copy of that commissioned from Michael Rysbrack in 1733–37, the original having been removed to the British Museum to protect it from further erosion.

Under the care of Philip Miller (1691–1771), appointed by Sloane in 1722, Chelsea became one of the best-known botanic gardens in Europe. In 1732 cotton seed was sent from Chelsea to the new settlement of Georgia and in 1736 the great Linnaeus visited the garden to study and collect plants. Many of the species introduced to Britain over the centuries and associated with Chelsea still thrive in the garden today, including magnificent magnolias named after Sloane’s professor, Pierre Magnol.

Hidden behind its tall brick walls, the garden is a secret paradise, but also a museum of living plants, arranged according to species and purpose. As well as the Systematic Order Beds, there is a Herb Garden, a woodland area, a fern house, a Garden of World Medicine and a Pharmaceutical Garden, where Deadly Nightshade (Atropa bella-donna) grows, with its round, black glossy fruits known as devil’s cherries. The garden is still used for research: the Natural History Museum’s Botany Department, for example, propagates tomatoes here for taxonomic research. Near the garden’s main buildings is the first rock garden in England. Built in 1773, it is made up of white Portland stones, some with ornamental moulding, from parts of the Tower of London then being demolished, and black basaltic lava from Iceland, donated by Sir Joseph Banks. Later in the 18th century it was further ornamented with shells and corals brought back from Tahiti as ships’ ballast by Captain Cook. A giant clam shell remains.

Today, Chelsea is a beautiful and tranquil place to spend a summer Sunday afternoon, when excellent home-made teas are served on the terrace overlooking the well cared-for lawns and ornamental but historic beds.

27.03.2015
13:55

Chartered Insurance Institute Museum

Address:

20 Aldermanbury, EC2V 7HY

Phone:

020-7417 4417

Website:

www.culture24.org.uk/se000233

Opening times:

By appointment only, Mon–Fri 9:00–17:00, closed bank holidays

How to get there:

Tube: Bank/Moorgate/St Paul’s

Entry fee:

Free

This small one-room museum on the 2nd floor of the Chartered Insurance Institute is dedicated to the early history of firefighting and the birth of accident insurance. The room is decorated with murals by C. Walter Hodges illustrating the themes of fire, marine and life insurance and displays early firefighting equipment, including hand-drawn fire-engines, fireman’s helmets, leather buckets, axes etc. There is a large collection of fire-marks of the early fire brigades, which were operated by insurance companies and would only fight fires in properties which bore the company’s mark.

27.03.2015
13:39

Charles Dickens Museum

Address:

48 Doughty Street, WC1N 2LX

Phone:

020-7405 2127

Website:

www.dickensmuseum.com

Opening times:

Mon–Sun 10:00–17:00

How to get there:

Tube: Russell Square

Entry fee:

Admission charge

Additional information:

Limited disabled access, shop

The novelist Charles Dickens (1812–70), his wife Catherine and their infant son Charles, came to live at this late 18th-century house in March 1837, and stayed until the end of 1839. Here, two daughters, Mary and Kate, were added to the family, and Dickens established his fame as a writer with the publication of Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby. The house, saved from demolition by the Dickens Fellowship in 1922, is a place of pilgrimage, and holds an enormous collection of Dickens memorabilia, including portraits of the novelist, his family and friends, personal relics, for example his snuff-box and cigar-cutter, autograph letters and manuscripts, and a comprehensive Dickens library. The clutter of a literary shrine does not entirely destroy the atmosphere of the family house it once was.

The Dining Room on the ground floor was where Dickens held the dinner parties in which he delighted. It contains a Spanish mahogany sideboard, which Dickens bought in 1839, and the grandfather clock which belonged to Moses Pickwick, a coach proprietor of Bath, whose name Dickens took for his famous character. Throughout the house are items of furniture from Gad’s Hill Place, Rochester, Dickens’ last home, including the Hall clock and, on the first floor, in the Study, the desk which he used at the end of his life. It was in this room that Pickwick Papers was completed and Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby written, and the table is the one at which he was writing The Mystery of Edwin Drood the day before he died. The museum also has Millais’ drawing of Dickens on his deathbed, Dickens’ china monkey (which accompanied him wherever he went), the Goldbeater’s Arm sign from 2 Manette Street, Soho, mentioned in A Tale of Two Cities, and the velvet-covered reading desk designed by Dickens and used by him for his public readings on his extensive tours of England and America.

The Drawing Room is decorated and arranged as it would have been in Dickens’ day, and on the second floor is the bedroom of his beloved sister-in-law, Mary Hogarth, who died here on 7th May 1837, aged seventeen. The basement contains the still room, wash house and wine cellar and also the Library of Dickens’ work which also shows a video of Dickens’ life and career.

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES OF LONDON

Details below are taken from our Blue Guide Museums and Galleries of London.  This is a 2005 title, here generally updated for website address and opening times, with useful comments from some of the museums themselves.  More recent information is given in Emily Barber's magisterial new Blue Guide London, "Exceptional update to a classic and useful guide to this amazing city" (Amazon reader review).

FULL LISTING of CURRENT EXHIBITIONS in London from Apollo Magazine »

Emily Barber recommends five major London museums »

Please do share your comments and updates with us via the form below the entry for each museum.

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National Maritime Museum
Wimbledon Windmill Museum
Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum
2 Willow Road (National Trust)
William Morris Gallery
Whitechapel Gallery
Westminster Abbey Museum
Wesley's Chapel
Wellington Arch (English Heritage)
Wallace Collection
Victoria & Albert Museum
Tower Bridge Exhibition
Tower of London (Historic Royal Palaces)
Tate Modern
Tate Britain
Sutton House (National Trust)
Spencer House
Southside House
South London Art Gallery
The Courtauld Institute of Art (Somerset House)
Sir John Soane's Museum
Shakespeare’s Globe
Serpentine Gallery
Science Museum
St Bride’s Crypt Museum
St Bartholomew’s Hospital Museum
Saatchi Gallery
Royal Society of Arts
The Royal Mews
Royal London Hospital Museum
The Faraday Museum
Royal Hospital Chelsea
RCM Museum of Music
Royal Academy of Music Museum
Royal Academy of Arts
Red House (National Trust)
Ranger’s House (English Heritage)
Ragged School Museum
The Queen’s Gallery
Prince Henry’s Room
The Photographers’ Gallery
Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
Osterley Park (National Trust)
Orleans House Gallery
Old Operating Theatre, Museum and Herb Garret
Natural History Museum
National Portrait Gallery
National Gallery
National Army Museum
Musical Museum
World Rugby Museum
Museum of the Order of St John
Museum No. 1 (Royal Botanic Gardens)
Museum of London
Garden Museum
Museum in Docklands (Museum of London)
The Royal Observatory
The Queen's House
Old Royal Naval College
Marianne North Gallery (Royal Botanic Gardens)
Marble Hill House (English Heritage)
Mall Galleries
Lord’s Tour and MCC Museum
London Transport Museum
London Fire Brigade Museum
London Canal Museum
18 Stafford Terrace – The Sambourne Family Home
Library and Museum of Freemasonry
Leighton House
Kingston Museum
Kew Palace (Historic Royal Palaces)
London Museum of Water & Steam
Kenwood House (English Heritage)
Kensington Palace (Historic Royal Palaces)
Keats House
Jewish Museum
Jewel Tower (English Heritage)
Jerwood Space
Imperial War Museum
ICA Institute of Contemporary Arts
Hunterian Museum
Horniman Museum
HMS Belfast (Imperial War Museum)
Hayward Gallery
Handel House Museum
Hampton Court Palace (Historic Royal Palaces)
Ham House (National Trust)
Guildhall Art Gallery
Guards Museum
Grant Museum of Zoology & Comparative Anatomy
Geffrye Museum of the Home
Fulham Palace
Freud Museum
Foundling Museum
Forty Hall & Estate
Florence Nightingale Museum
Firepower: The Royal Artillery Museum
Fenton House (National Trust)
Fashion and Textile Museum
Fan Museum
Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art
Eltham Palace (English Heritage)
Dulwich Picture Gallery
Dr Johnson’s House
Dennis Severs' House
Danson House
Cutty Sark
Contemporary Applied Arts
Chiswick House (English Heritage)
Chelsea Physic Garden
Chartered Insurance Institute Museum
Charles Dickens Museum
Carlyle’s House (National Trust)
Camden Arts Centre
Cabinet War Rooms & Churchill Museum (Imperial War Museum)
Burgh House - The Hampstead Museum
Buckingham Palace
Brunel Engine House
Brunei Gallery SOAS
British Optical Association Museum
The British Museum
The British Library
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Black Cultural Archives
Museum of Childhood (Victoria & Albert Museum)
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Benjamin Franklin House
Ben Uri Gallery - The London Jewish Museum of Art
Barbican Art Gallery
Banqueting House (Historic Royal Palaces)
Bankside Gallery
Bank of England Museum
All Hallows Undercroft Museum
Alexander Fleming Laboratory Museum

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