Comments on Blue Guide Sicily

9th edition
8th edition

 

Sicily offers an enormous range of history: Greeks, Romans, Arabs and the Normans have all left their mark on a visually stunning landscape of volcanoes and vineyards.

Buy the book from blueguides.com here»

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Gravatar: ReaderReader
26.06.2017
13:07
Comment

Hello

A few entries need to be updated in Blue Guide Sicily.

Avola - Cafe Finocchiaro is listed as one of the most famous in Italy and we drove a 100km to reach Avola. To our surprise found that the cafe has been closed since a few years.

Cava Grande di Cassibile- the entry for Cava Grande is excellent and we wouldn't have found it if not for the Blue Guide. However, the directions to reach could be better as the signage on the actual road is very poor. Maybe include a small map.

La Foglia in Syracuse - we went to this restaurant on Blue Guide's recommendation and I should say it has been the best meal so far in Sicily. Thanks. We have also been to Don Camillo. It is good but La Foglia is better.

Il Borghetto in Taormina - We went to this restaurant in Taormina again based on Blue Guide's recommendation. It is in a piazza that doesn't see much crowd but for the excellent quality of food and service this place deserves a much larger crowd. Thanks for the recommendation.

Blue Guide Sicily is how I wanted a Guide book to be with enough historical sketches, background information and good solid practical information. A few more pictures would be good, but then the book will probably become too unwieldy.

Gravatar: Kenneth Alan CollinsKenneth Alan Collins
18.12.2015
09:20
Sicily 2015

To Whom It May Concern: My spouse and I recently made a trip to Sicily, Malta, and Calabria, and spent the majority of our time in Sicily (mid-October into early November). We used Ellen Grady's Blue Guide - Sicily (8th edition, 2012) extensive because of its focus - as is the case with all Blue Guides - on art, architecture, and history. Here are a few practical comments relating to lodgings: 1) Ragusa: The Hotel Rafael, which we had decided had the location and price range suitable for us, no longer exists. It is now a refugee shelter 2) Piazza Armerina: A real find, though we did not stay there (we took a tour by the very gracious owner) is the Suite d'Autore, Via Monte, 1, at the corner of the Piazza Duomo. This is a combination gallery and hotel. Prices are very reasonable (60 - 80 euro/night, double, with breakfast). Each room is beautifully, and intelligently decorated in the spirit of an art movement. It is worth checking it out, and we think, listing it in a future edition of the Blue Guide. 3) Piazza Armerina: We stayed at B&B 33, which is near Del Centro, which is the B&B listed in the guide. Checking out Del Centro, I was distinctly unimpressed. The nearby B&B 33 (which is on Umberto 33) we stumbled upon and stayed at. It is run by a early middle-aged couple. Rooms are comfortable and on the top floor is a modern kitchen with a fabulous view out over the historic center. The husband owns a nearby wine shop selling local wines and olive oils and generously invites one to taste everything. The breakfast spread was absolutely wonderful, including locally made ricotta cheese, lots of coffee, fresh cornetti, and much, much more. Altogether a wonderful experience. 4) Mazara del Vallo: We used the Blue Guide recommendation for lodging in Mazara del Vallo (a B&B in the renovated old railroad station). The son of the owner recommended a simple trattoria not too far away run by a friend, and it turned out the best simple meal we had on the whole trip. The name is Trattoria Da Giacomo - we shared a sublime pasta (bucatini) dish with a sauce made of local ingredients (including an unusual fish roe) and then shared a roasted chicken. With a half liter of house wine, the entire bill came to 20 euros. It was the real "find" of our entire trip. I hope this feedback will help for a future edition of this title in the Blue Guide series.

Gravatar: Reader from AustraliaReader from Australia
05.02.2014
11:35
Blue Guide Sicily review

From a reader in Australia: I have been meaning to write to you ever since I got back from my latest trip to Sicily in mid-July. I used your guide to Sicily on this trip and was mostly very happy with it. Having spent 3.5 months there last year, this time (another month June-July) I really wanted a guidebook that gave more in-depth info and the Blue Guide did that. Overall it was excellent and I was very happy with my purchase. I am interested in Italian history, art and architecture as well as food and wine and I found the guide very informative. A friend of mine who lives in Sicily (in Alia) was particularly impressed with your historical overview. He said it put things into better perspective than a lot of things he had read and answered a lot of questions he’d had about how things tied together historically. And I have to say we were impressed that Alia and Roccapalumba appeared in the guide at all! I am taking you at your word (where you say you welcome suggestions etc): In terms of suggestions for improvement I would have liked your dining and accommodation tips to come closer to the actual place rather than having everything for one provincia at the end of a rather large section. I actually thought your guide didn’t have that info for some time because it was so far away from where I was looking. I did find two things that I think were incorrect. For Ustica on p 107 it says the Torre Santa Maria is the archaeological museum. The museum is now in town at the old prisoner’s barracks (which has the big fosso they used to put prisoners in for solitary confinement). Sorry I don’t know the street name as I never really found a decent map of the town but if heading uphill up the main piazza it’s off to the right just past the little park area. Just go to the end as it’s on the edge of the cliff (spectacular views). The Crai supermarket is down an alley to the right as you go. And the Cantine Florio in Marsala (pp 152-153) charges 20 euro for the guided tour and degustation but it was worth every centesimo. (Your info appears to indicate that it’s free.) They have an excellent showroom where you can buy gift packs of their wines at reasonable prices. Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri (p43) seems to be visitable only with guided tours but when I went in July there was no need to book. You just turned up. Tours in languages other than English or Italian might be problematic. The guides were students of the uni and it cost 5 euro. They took me by myself AND didn’t close for lunch. Fantastic value. BTW I’m not sure if you have mentioned this somewhere but it might be worth mentioning that in Sicily regardless of what their advertised hours are - on signs outside museums, on their websites etc - things can always change! Not to mention that no-one ever has change so keep a large supply of coins. Some other things: Alia has an agriturismo called Al Lago Verde. The main business is the restaurant which is excellent but they also have rooms. I haven’t stayed there but have eaten there a number of times. The food is terrific but the owner’s wife is famous for over-charging and they don’t bring an itemised bill so you need to keep track of what you’ve been eating and what it costs. The husband is lovely. The prices for the quality and quantity of food are very reasonable. Their mixed antipasto is delicious, very different from the stereotypical antipasti and practically a meal in itself. They have a lot of meat dishes but also pizza. There is also a good pizzeria in Alia itself – Sutta le Archi – just off the main drag in Via Archi. But it should be avoided at all costs on Friday and Saturday nights as it’s packed with a zillion young people and it takes hours (literally) to be served. Apparently if a takeaway order comes in for the same type of pizza you’ve ordered they’ll sell it to the takeaway person! But at quieter times and at lunchtime it’s good. Again they might overcharge foreigners but it’s very reasonably priced and the pizzas and other food are good. Not haute cuisine though. Not sure if you prefer to feature more fine-dining places? [No--we like to feature a range of places. Ed.] Alia’s Bar Centrale has been on TV as having the cheapest coffee in Italy. 20c for an espresso. Il Granaio in Roccapalumba is also good. But these last two (Sutta le Archi and Granaio) can’t compare with Lago Verde and come nowhere near Vin Vito and Giardino delle Aloe (below). They’re just good-value, good trattorie. I can also highly recommend Osteria Vin Vito in Castellana Sicula – superb. Everything was wonderful but the tronchetto dessert (regional specialty – ricotta pastry thing) was divine and the caponata was the best I’ve ever had. Favignana – Il GIardino delle Aloe – spectacular food in a lovely garden setting. They also have rooms. You can buy half-pension plans from some hotels on the island (I stayed at Villaggio l’Oasi) and eat at various restaurants on the list for 25 euro a night. Amazing value. Castellamare del Golfo – Egesta Mare was excellent. And Caccamo’s A Castellana, in the dungeons of the castle, is reliable, extensive menu and very reasonably-priced. Sciacca – at the port, the trattoria Ristorante Italia da Nino. Despite the unprepossessing name, really good seafood. And if it lasts, the tiny slow food-type place in Ustica, Carruba e Cannella. Via Tre Mulini. Just a few tables. Run by a young couple with just a few dishes but superb. Most of it organic. They do take-away too. Food is sold by weight. Their apple caponata (Palermitan specialty) is delicious. Oh yes, the best cannoli on the planet are from the hole-in-the-wall Pasticceria d'Ambra in Lipari.

Gravatar: ReaderReader
16.11.2013
16:49
Carravagio in Messina

Dear Sir/Madam, I am writing to you in order to inform about an information that I think is wrong. I have recently purchased a copy of the eighth edition (2012) of Blue Guide Sicily. I usually double-check the information with internet sites and I think there is a mistake in the book. Here are the details: in page number 432, talking about the masterpieces by Caravaggio hold in the Museo Regionale of Messina, according to the book, they are: Nativity and The Raising of Lazarus. As you can check in this web (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nativity_with_St._Francis_and_St._Lawrence), Nativity was stolen in 1969 in Palermo and remains lost. However, this web: http://www.regione.sicilia.it/beniculturali/dirbenicult/database/page_musei/pagina_musei.asp?id=5&idsito=43, informs that the painting hold in Messina is Adorazione dei pastori. The information is confirmed here: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adorazione_dei_pastori_(Caravaggio). Nevertheless, the rest of the information given by the guide about the history of the painting (commissioned by the Senate of Messina for the Capuchin church) is right, as well as the other masterpiece, The Raising of Lazarus. I hope this information is helpfull for you, and I would like to congratulate you for this excelent guide. Yours faithfully,

Gravatar: ReaderReader
16.11.2013
16:40
Comments on Blu eGuide Sicily

Hello. I have been meaning to write to you ever since I got back from my latest trip to Sicily in mid-July. I used your guide to Sicily on this trip and was mostly very happy with it. Having spent 3.5 months there last year, this time (another month June-July) I really wanted a guidebook that gave more in-depth info and the Blue Guide did that. Overall it was excellent and I was very happy with my purchase. I am interested in Italian history, art and architecture as well as food and wine and I found the guide very informative. A friend of mine who lives in Sicily (in Alia) was particularly impressed with your historical overview. He said it put things into better perspective than a lot of things he had read and answered a lot of questions he’d had about how things tied together historically. And I have to say we were impressed that Alia and Roccapalumba appeared in the guide at all! I am taking you at your word (where you say you welcome suggestions etc): In terms of suggestions for improvement I would have liked your dining and accommodation tips to come closer to the actual place rather than having everything for one provincia at the end of a rather large section. E.g. The Rough Guide, though far from as detailed as the Blue Guide, has the info at the end of the historical and sight-seeing info for each place and personally I find that more user-friendly. I actually thought your guide didn’t have that info for some time because it was so far away from where I was looking. I did find two things that I think were incorrect. For Ustica on p 107 it says the Torre Santa Maria is the archaeological museum. The museum is now in town at the old prisoner’s barracks (which has the big fosso they used to put prisoners in for solitary confinement). Sorry I don’t know the street name as I never really found a decent map of the town but if heading uphill up the main piazza it’s off to the right just past the little park area. Just go to the end as it’s on the edge of the cliff (spectacular views). The Crai supermarket is down an alley to the right as you go. And the Cantine Florio in Marsala (pp 152-153) charges 20 euro for the guided tour and degustation but it was worth every centesimo. (Your info appears to indicate that it’s free.) They have an excellent showroom where you can buy gift packs of their wines at reasonable prices. Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri (p43) seems to be vistable only with guided tours but when I went in July there was no need to book. You just turned up. Tours in languages other than English or Italian might be problematic. The guides were students of the uni and it cost 5 euro. They took me by myself AND didn’t close for lunch. Fantastic value. BTW I’m not sure if you have mentioned this somewhere but it might be worth mentioning that in Sicily regardless of what their advertised hours are - on signs outside museums, on their websites etc - things can always change! Not to mention that no-one ever has change so keep a large supply of coins. Some other things: Alia has an agriturismo called Al Lago Verde. The main business is the restaurant which is excellent but they also have rooms. I haven’t stayed there but have eaten there a number of times. The food is terrific but the owner’s wife is famous for over-charging and they don’t bring an itemised bill so you need to keep track of what you’ve been eating and what it costs. The husband is lovely. The prices for the quality and quantity of food are very reasonable. Their mixed antipasto is delicious, very different from the stereotypical antipasti and practically a meal in itself. They have a lot of meat dishes but also pizza. There is also a good pizzeria in Alia itself – Sutta le Archi – just off the main drag in Via Archi. But it should be avoided at all costs on Friday and Saturday nights as it’s packed with a zillion young people and it takes hours (literally) to be served. Apparently if a takeaway order comes in for the same type of pizza you’ve ordered they’ll sell it to the takeaway person! But at quieter times and at lunchtime it’s good. Again they might overcharge foreigners but it’s very reasonably priced and the pizzas and other food are good. Not haute cuisine though. Not sure if you prefer to feature more fine-dining places? Alia’s Bar Centrale has been on TV as having the cheapest coffee in Italy. 20c for an espresso. Il Granaio in Roccapalumba is also good. But these last two (Sutta le Archi and Granaio) can’t compare with Lago Verde and come nowhere near Vin Vito and Giardino delle Aloe (below). They’re just good-value, good trattorie. I can also highly recommend Osteria Vin Vito in Castellana Sicula – superb. Everything was wonderful but the tronchetto dessert (regional specialty – ricotta pastry thing) was divine and the caponata was the best I’ve ever had. Favignana – Il GIardino delle Aloe – spectacular food in a lovely garden setting. They also have rooms. You can buy half-pension plans from some hotels on the island (I stayed at Villaggio l’Oasi) and eat at various restaurants on the list for 25 euro a night. Amazing value. Castellamare del Golfo – Egesta Mare was excellent. And Caccamo’s A Castellana, in the dungeons of the castle, is reliable, extensive menu and very reasonably-priced. Sciacca – at the port, the trattoria Ristorante Italia da Nino. Despite the unprepossessing name, really good seafood. And if it lasts, the tiny slow food-type place in Ustica, Carruba e Cannella. Via Tre Mulini. Just a few tables. Run by a young couple with just a few dishes but superb. Most of it organic . They do take-away too. Food is sold by weight. Their apple caponata (Palermitan specialty) is delicious. Oh yes, best cannoli on the planet are from the hole-in-the-wall Pasticceria d’Ambra in Lipari. Hope you don’t mind my raving on. I hope some of it might be useful.

Gravatar: ReaderReader
16.11.2013
16:32
Sicily p.386 Teatro Massimo Bellini

Dear Blue Guide Editors, I have been a great Blue Guide fan for years, am much enjoying the 2012 edition on my current trip to Sicily, my ninth, and greatly look forward to using the India edition this winter. P.386 of the Sicily edition, however, says the Teatro Massimo Bellini opened with the premiere if Bellini's "Norma" in 1890. But "Norma" had its premiere elsewhere in 1831. (Maybe this was the Catania premiere, but that's not the same thing.) I don't ever remember spotting an error in a Blue Guide before, and record my gratitude for your guides to many cities and regions in several different countries.

Gravatar: Sicily ToursSicily Tours
08.08.2012
14:42
comment

  • Sicily Tours

    Looking forward to the new edition of the Blue Guide Sicily. I’m sure the revising editor Michael Metcalfe has turned in a great tome. It will stand pride of place alongside our copy of the Blue Guide to the Aegean Islands which is simply fabulous.

.
Gravatar: ReaderReader
10.03.2011
14:44
comment

Palermo - Palazzo Marchesi Ugo delle Favare. Just talked with them: they have not rented apartments in many years. The phone number listed is their private number.

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Gravatar: ReaderReader
08.05.2010
15:12
question

do you have a blue guide for Palermo or, if not, will you have one in the future…
if not, can you recommend one of yours
and/or someone else’s…
thank you

.
Gravatar: ReaderReader
05.10.2009
15:14
comment

La Cirasella (farmhouse accomodation in Province of Catania) on page 435. The web site address in the book is incorrect. It should be: http://www.cirasellaetna.com Please correct this error. This is a wonderful place to stay–gracious hosts, peaceful setting, delicious meals.

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Gravatar: Sergei VarshavskySergei Varshavsky
15.09.2009
16:07
comment

Few errors: addresses, open hours, etc. The most important: Convento dei Cappuccini (p.69) is NOT at 1 Via Cappuccine, it is at 1 Piazza Cappuccine! Besides, I would not name the article “Convento etc.” I would recommend to name it clearly and explicitly: Cattacombe dei Cappuccini.

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Gravatar: Kevin WalshKevin Walsh
12.05.2009
16:11
comment

My wife and I are long-time enthusiasts of the Blue Guide series, having carried several volumes to Italy in the early eighties, but it was not until this month that we had the opportunity to experience the Guide in its new incarnation during our travels in Sicily. Of the many volumes we had in hand, the Blue Guide towered above all. The beautifully written narrative of Ellen Grady was seasoned with the wit and perception, and it seemed possible to inhabit an earlier world of Goethe and Lawrence when viewed through her eyes. Restaurant and hotel recommendations–new to us in the series– were not only welcome but well-chosen, as were the appendices dedicated to wine and food. We particularly enjoyed the beautiful color photographs–printed on high quality paper stock– taken by Giaccomo Mazza–especially those that departed from conventional travel guide fare and showed almost abstract landscapes in a profusion of colors.

In fact, we were especially fortunate to have been escorted in our travels by Giaccomo, a true renaissance man who is steeped in a knowledge of classical antiquity, baroque art and architecture, and virtually anything about which we happened to inquire. Because Giaccomo is an individual who is not only richly informed about the region and gifted with an artist’s eye, but also modest, he did not tell of us his affiliation with the Guide until late in our trip, after he had seen us consult it on many occasions. We have since acquired the Grady/ Mazza volume on Le Marche, which appears to be another gem, and are especially looking forward to what we understand is their upcoming collaboration on Egypt.
We are delighted that the Blue Guide series is better now than it has ever been before. We look forward to traveling with you in the years ahead!

.
Gravatar: Jeni PorterJeni Porter
20.08.2008
16:15
comment

Hi there. Just returned from my second trip to Sicily using the Blue Guide as our main reference. We took the guide’s advice on L’Arco in Modica and it was truly awful. The wine was almost undrinkable, the antipasto and pasta by far the worst we had anywhere in Sicily. The charm of not having a written menu was lost when we were charged 30 euro for a dud meal, significantly more than we had paid for vastly superior food elsewhere. One place worth including for Modica is Osteria dei Sapori Perduti, on Corso Umberto, very reasonably priced authentic and flavoursome rustic local food. Phone 0932944247. We have been about five times over two different trips and it is great - the same staff in the past couple of years, very busy and full of locals.

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Gravatar: David FinksteinDavid Finkstein
06.08.2008
16:20
comment

We just returned from our trip to Sicilia which was, as predicted by your unnamed author, wonderful. The Blue Guide proved to be indispensable and fantastic! We traveled with several, “Lonely Planet”, Touring Club of Italy’s “Authentic Sicily” to name a couple, but the Blue Guide is far and away the best!

One of the highlights was most certainly our stay at La Finestra sul Sale. It way far beyond anything I had imagined or even what was described below. La Finestra is truly unique. It is also one of the most evocative, romantic, friendly, beautiful, isolated and tranquil places I have ever stayed or even imagined staying. Well almost. Unfortunately, and they did not tell us this until after we checked in, they have loud DJ or live music at the cafe downstairs Thursday through Sunday nights! As you know, they only have 4 beautifully-restored rooms, all of which are directly upstairs from the cafe. The 2 women who work at the reception desk at the salt museum in the windmill out on the jetty were incredibly hospitable and welcoming. After checking in there, we went to settle into our 2 rooms back on the mainland (we were the only guests!) After unloading our bags, Antonino, who seems to run the bar, at least at night, apologetically told me that the women forgot to tell us when we checked in that there would be music tonight. “Very nice music,” he said, “so people can dance. It ill be over by 12:45am. Will that be ok?” because, of course, he noticed that one of my traveling partners is 6 months pregnant and was staying in the room directly above the speakers. So, we decided to go out to dinner and stay out as late as pregnancy would allow, so as to miss as much of the noise, er…music, as possible. For dinner, we paid €8 round-trip per person for Diego to take us by boat directly from our front door to Isola Lunga where the defunct Ecoresort Sola Mare Vento has become the Isola Longa Ecoresort, containing an excellent, expensive all-seafood restaurant and 3 gorgeously restored, mosquito-netted guest rooms. (Isola Lunga, Marsala (TP). Fax: 0923 966036. Claudia Marino, Reception, cell: 320 482 4168. Antonino Parrinello (our waiter) cell: 328 873 7690 - 340 886 8806, email: isolalongaecoresort@libero.it. This is all from their business card., including the 2 different spellings of Lunga and Longa.) We had a fantastic meal (I would certainly highly recommend the restaurant for a splurge) and befriended our waiter, Antonino, who gave us a proud tour of the 3 guest rooms, then joined us all for the last boat back to the mainland. You could hear the blaring music halfway across the shallow lagoon as we approached through the otherwise-silent, otherwise-idyllic full-moon-lit night. It as already nearly 1am, so I asked Antonino when it would be finished and this time he “promised” me it would be done by 1:30! Did I mention that it was blaringly loud, and glaringly bad American pop (”YMCA” by the Village People!?!?) and that nobody was dancing or seemingly even paying any attention to the music? We tried to ignore it, only to find upon entering our rooms that the air conditioning had stopped working. And it was hot! Antonino messed around with it and finally got it working, but it proceeded to shut off every hour or 2 throughout the rest of our stay, requiring us to repeatedly mess with the fuse box outside in the hallway… The music went on until just after 1:30am, and I finally fell asleep to the sounds of the young crowd chatting away into the wee hours long after the music ended. Upon arising the next morning, we noticed the poster announcing live music tonight! Oh boy. I went and spoke with the women at reception and they seemed perturbed that the music had gone on longer it was “supposed” to and vowed to speak with Antonino about it. That night we went into Marsala for another fine dinner, this time at Trattoria Garibaldi., again hoping to avoid the bulk of the “music”. (One thing we learned here; unlike everywhere else we’d been in Sicilia so far, Catania, Siracusa, Noto, Enna, Cefalu’ where nobody goes out to eat until 10pm or later [in Ortygia I witnessed a family of 4 first sitting down to order dinner at a pizzeria in the Piazza Duomo at 11:30 pm!] Marsala is an early town. People eat at 8 and the waitress was none too happy to have us seated and just beginning to slowly peruse the menu at 9:30. Their kitchen closes at 10!) (I must also put in a plug here for the fantastically delicious E&N pasticceria at Via XI Maggio, 130, 91025 Marsala, Tel/Fax: 0923 951 969http://www.pasticceriaen.com. The pasta al forno we had was perfect. And when the boss noticed me photographing their ridiculously realistic looking marzipan fruits, he called one of his bakers over to pull a cassatta out of the cooler and pose for a photograph. GREAT place!) Returning late after a nice passeggiata around deserted Marsala, we came upon an even more horrendous scene than the night before. Two live performers, a singer and drummer, playing along to recorded backing tracks. Loudly. The Village People’s “YMCA” yet again! This time I expressed my disappointment and upset to Antonino who apologized and said once again that it would be finished by 1:20. At 1:20am, when there was no sign of the music subsiding, I went down to speak with him again. This time Antonino was not so nice; clearly he’d been drinking and had had enough of this American party-pooper. He exclaimed, “Enough! I told you about the music when you checked in yesterday!” I calmly said, yes you did, but what the hell were we supposed to do at that point? Go somewhere else? Look, I do not want to ruin anybody’s good time, but this is just not right. He agreed, but still became visibly irate, if not threatening (he’s a big guy) and said he’s turn it down a bit and that it would be over by 1:30. He did not turn it down and it did not end by 1:30, but rather much closer to 2am. And the air conditioner continued to zonk out every couple of hours throughout the night… The next day we were all rather upset and needlessly exhausted, especially my pregnant sister-in-law. So, I went to talk with the reception women before checking out. The salt museum shop was crowded with tourists, so I asked her to step outside so I could speak with her. I explained everything that had happened, adding that also, my sister-in-law’s room had clearly not been cleaned in a while. She listened and seemed quite upset about it herself. I mainly complained that we had not been told about this beforehand. In fact, I had decided against staying at another recommended hotel, Delfino Beach Hotel, because I had read on TripAdvisor that they have a very loud nightclub there. It as clear to me that the people running the hotel (office) by day, have no idea what really goes on there at night when they have gone. My other main complaint was that nobody had even remotely apologized. Antonino could have at least offered me a drink or something, for crying out loud. It was not as though we were paying €5 for a hostel room; my single room cost €100 per night. She called her boss, and while she was on the phone in walked her true boss, the creator/restorer of the windmill itself, octogenarian Signore Infersa or Ettore, I don’t know which. She relayed the story to him, and boy did he seem upset. (Finally!) When it got the the bit about Antonino, he really got upset, saying, “That guy is inconsiderate of everyone! Even the way he drives!” I also told them both what an incredibly beautiful, romantic, unique and perfect place they have there, and how eager I am to recommend it to everyone I know personally and online, but alas… This, of course, really got to them. And I meant it, obviously. She also pointed out to the old-world gentleman that we are in fact young, and probably like loud music; imagine if it were someone else. Yes, I added, I had been thinking of this too. I cannot even imagine if my 72 year-old father were with us. Or some older married Italian couple. And thank God I speak Italian! In the end, they completely ignored the issue of the room not having been cleaned, made excuses for the intermittent air conditioning, blaming it on the electric company/grid (except it was only the A/C that went out, no lights,nothing else…), and gave us a 20% discount on our rooms (€80 and €104 instead of €100 and €130 for a single and double, respectively. Which included breakfast and free admission to the salt museum and windmill.). And we did not let it ruin our vacation. Bottom line, La Finestra sul Sale is the perfect place to stay for a romantic western Sicilian getaway…as long as you stay only Monday through Wednesday! Thurs- Sun…head somewhere else or prepare not to sleep.

..
Gravatar: shabnam merchantshabnam merchant
01.08.2008
16:23
comment

“La Finestra sul Sale” is a great place to stay, but beware that the cafe/restaurant downstairs turns into a nightclub with loud music (either DJ or live), from thursday through sunday - don’t expect to be able to sleep until 1:30 am, as this area is directly below the rooms.

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Gravatar: AuthorAuthor
02.06.2008
16:33
comment

Sorry, bad news. The Resort was forced to close because Isola Longa is part of a wildlife protected area, which does not foresee accommodation for visitors, even on such a Spartan basis. It is a shame, because I loved it. However, the same company are still running their B&B in the saltmill Ettore e Infersa, see http://www.salineettoreinfersa.com, La Finestra sul Sale, which is stunning. If they go there, they will be able to sympathise with the charming lady who wanted to launch the project, something entirely new for Sicily.

Yes, Isola Longa is sometimes called Isola Grande. I am sure you will have a wonderful holiday in the area.

.
Gravatar: ReaderReader
01.06.2008
16:26
comment

  • In current issue on page 180 you recommend Ecoresort Sola Mare Vento in outside of Marsala. I have searched and searched the internet, even searching under the famous chef’s name, and can find absolutely nothing! Would you happen to have any further information, or at least be able to confirm that the place still exists? In fact, the guide book gives the location only as Isola Longa, which also does not exist…perhaps it is supposed to be Isola Grande, just north of Marsala? The description sounds fantastic, and we’d really love to stay there on our upcoming visit… Thanks! :- David

.

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Bookshops in Budapest
Budapest at the Biennale
Living with Leonardo
The Zeugma Mosaics Saga
News from Syracuse
Raphael in Bergamo
Titian in Brescia
Comments and Updates on Blue Guide Budapest
Heroism on the Danube
The 'Romanesque Hall' in Budapest
Dürer in Milan
Re-interpreting the Trojan Horse
Charles I: King and Collector
Fleming and Honour Remembered
Pictures from Lake Maggiore
A late Art Nouveau treasure in Budapest
Anna: Female destinies in Transylvania
What’s on in Florence
Art Within Limits
A Time in Rome
Diana Athill, 'A Florence Diary'
Season’s Greetings
Christmas with the Gonzaga
Aegean Turkey: Troy to Bodrum
Collectors in Florence
European rail changes 2018
A people who changed history
Return to 'A Room with a View'
Italian island food
The Scythians at the British Museum
Rogues' Gallery by Philip Hook
Ferragamo's Return
Silence of the looms
Grammar and Grace
The Seuso Saga
Giuliano da Sangallo
The Black Fields of Kula
Leonardo's "Adoration of the Magi" restored
Venice before Easter
Selectivity at the Uffizi
Guide to the Via Francigena
What Ariosto could see
News from Florence: Giovanni dal Ponte
More than just the David
The formidable Empress Matilda
Life, Art and Kenneth Clark
Hedonist's travel, Hungarian wine
Remarkable Manuscripts
Abstract Expressionism at the RA
Comments on Hungarian Wine: A Tasting Trip to the New Old...
Transylvania Launched
Which 50 Sites of Antiquity?
A Treasure in Cagli
The Transylvanian Book Festival
Comments on Travels in Transylvania: The Greater Târnava...
Roman Brixia
The new Museo degli Innocenti
Wine guide wins prize
Jesters at the Court of the Medici
Budapest, Freedom and the Olympics
The Roman Forum Reconstructed
Bernini's Beloved
Blue Guide Paris on Amazon
The Imperial Ramp in the Roman Forum
Sabbioneta, Cryptic City
Secret delights of Florence: the Bellini private museum
Cutting-edge mosque design in Albania
St Francis in Florence
To Austria’s Lake District by rail
Pilgrimage pathways to and from Rome
Five major London museums
Napoleon and Paris: Dreams of a capital
Whither Tate Britain?
The many lives of Nasreddin Hoca
Lesley Blanch: On the Wilder Shores of Love
The Middle Ages on the Road
Hellenistic bronzes in Florence
Europe by rail - an introduction
Frescoes in a convent of a closed order of nuns
Michelin starred Paris
A Michelangelo discovery?
Jan Morris: Ciao, Carpaccio: An Infatuation
The Venus de Milo fights back
Winter in Florence: a new look at Donatello
Tea (or coffee) with the Sultan
Artwork of the Month: January. Medieval stained glass
Which? ranks Blue Guides #2
Giacomo Leopardi: A poet in film
Sassoferrato and the Aion Mosaic
The Aventine and Turner in Rome
Artwork of the Month: December
Rendez-vous with Art
Rembrandt and the Dutch Golden Age
Giovanni Battista Moroni
London The Information Capital
Changes to European rail services for 2015
Comments on Blue Guide London
Egypt, Greece, & Rome
The Medici Villas of Tuscany and Tourism
Artwork of the Month: November. Reason, Unreason and the...
The first collectors of 'Primitives'
From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town
Artwork of the Month: October. The Arch of Constantine
Sorting out the Uffizi
Waging war with a view
Dull London? Surely a mistake
Artwork of the month: September. Watercolour of the Great...
Italian Venice: A History
A tale of three museums
Rissëu
All Aboard the Cheese Train
National Gallery London to allow photography
Artwork of the Month: August. Bust of Augustus Caesar from...
Sacred Splendours: reliquaries of Florence's pious grand...
Book Review. Helena Attlee: The Land where Lemons Grow
Holiday reading
Artwork of the Month: July. The Phaistos Disc
Budapest to Vienna and Salzburg by Railjet
Marvellous and Macabre: the art of Jacopo Ligozzi
David Esterly - The Lost Carving: A Journey to the Heart of...
Artwork of the month: June, Pordenone's Noli me Tangere
Budapest to Serbia by EuroCity Avala
Saving the Great Bear: Trieste's floating crane
News from Florence
Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
Baccio Bandinelli: a rehabilitation
Artwork of the month: May. "Flora", Pompeii
Travelling around Britain in style
In praise of plague cakes
Princesses from the Trabzon Empire
Artwork of the month: April. The Seuso Silver
Uffizi selfies come to Budapest
Florentine Mannerists at Palazzo Strozzi
Rome: seasonal stations
Sustainable living in Bolzano
Artwork of the month: March. Murillo's Flower Girl
Tastes change
Francesco Laurana's serene beauty
Being Mithridates
Florence and Buda: two cities of learning
Thoughts on Rome
Copyrighting Heritage
Food is the new Florence
A Grumpy Visit to Westminster Abbey
The Honey Of Hybla
So what is the Turkish Van?
The Pike: by Lucy Hughes-Hallett
Smoothly off the buffers
Under Another Sky
'Art under Attack' at Tate Britain
Comments on Smoothly from Harrow
Renaissance art from Florence to Paris and back
Comments on Blue Guide Venice
Hepworth's "Winged Figure": 50th anniversary
Tying the Knot in Urfa
Venice and the Politcs of Washing
Comments on Staten Island: A Blue Guide Travel Monograph
Comments on Short Guide to London 1953
Turin restored and rejuvenated
A palatial art museum in Trieste
The cloisters of Santa Maria Novella
The wonderful Palazzo Grimani, Venice
Pope Benedict: an unorthodox farewell
Obscure St Valentine and his famous Feast Day
Burano in February
The St Agnes lambs
Leonardo’s “Adoration of the Magi” in restoration
Cathedral picks: Exeter
The real Patrick Leigh Fermor?
The joy of Giambattista Tiepolo
Leonardo’s “Battle of Anghiari”
In praise of Venice’s water transport system
The Red Rooms at the Uffizi
The Blue Rooms at the Uffizi
A trip to the Port of Trajan, outside Rome
Pour l’honneur de la France
An early-morning visit to Sant’Andrea delle Fratte, Rome
Church of SS Luca e Martina reopens above Roman Forum
How the tide turned at the Milvian Bridge
A compelling reason to visit Trapani province
St Augustine and his mother at Ostia
Visiting St Paul’s in London
Hadrian, Antinoüs and the Christian Fathers
Earliest-known image of a martyrdom
Can’t face the Vatican crowds? Try San Lorenzo
Turin, Pisa and mathematics
Ideal cities are all around us. It’s simply a matter of...
On Canaletto and Guardi and Venetian Light
Mithraism: a Roman Mystery Religion
Random Musings on Pontormo and Vermeer
The Amphitheatre of Londinium
Edward Lear and Crete
A handful of favourite things to see in Sicily
The mystery of the veiled virgins
Venice without the crowds
Cividale del Friuli and the Lombards
The Trouble with Snake Goddesses
The tragedy of Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico
Oranges, lemons and relic cults: an escape from the queues...
City Picks: Verona
Hitherto unknown language discovered in east Anatolia
Painting of the Day
Museo Barracco: a little-visited gem
Santo Stefano Rotondo in Rome
Staten Island: Upcoming Exhibition …
International Gothic at the Uffizi
Celebrating Santa Rosalia, patron of Palermo
Delhi Ghost Trail
Comments on Pilgrim's Rome: A Blue Guide Travel Monograph
The Roman Villa at Balácapuszta (Baláca, Nemesvámos,...
The Bard of….Messina? Was Shakespeare Sicilian?
Rereading Ruskin
Sicily’s emblem: the Trinacria
Luca Signorelli on exhibition in Umbria
The Tribuna of the Uffizi reopens
The Venice equivalent of the anonymous Tweet?
Comments on Blue Guide Sicily
Sicilian Holiday Reading
Attila the Hun and the Foundation of Venice
Death in Venice cocktail a hit
The Gentry: Stories of the English
381 years ago this June
Brooklyn Bridge: a New York landmark
A Venetian Update
Sixth-century church to reopen
Roman Aquileia
Springtime in Friuli
Northern Italy dining and accommodation recommendations
Al Dente: Madness, Beauty & the Food of Rome
A celebration of Lucca
Romantic music in a Baroque setting
Blue Guide India Delhi Launch
Nikolaus Pevsner: The Life
The Man of Numbers: Fibonacci’s Arithmetic Revolution
Comments on Blue Guide India
The Roman Forum
Whispering City: Rome and its Histories
The 15th-century Health Museum at Edirne
City of Fortune, How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire
Books about Istanbul
Comments on Blue Guide Istanbul
Comments on Blue Guide Florence
Constantine: Unconquered Emperor, Christian Victor
Comments on The Venice Lido: a Blue Guide Travel Monograph
Comments on Blue Guide Literary Companions: Rome, London,...
Comments on Blue Guide Italy Food Companion
The 54th Venice Biennale stars Tintoretto
Holy Bones, Holy Dust
RECOMMENDED PLACES TO STAY AND EAT ON CRETE
Delhi: Adventures in a Megacity
Full Circle: How the Classical World Came Back to Us
Comments on Blue Guide Turkey
Comments on Blue Guide Rome
Comments on Blue Guide Hay-on-Wye
Comments on Blue Guide Greece the Aegean Islands
Comments on Blue Guide Crete
Comments on Sites of Antiquity: from Ancient Egypt to the...
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Familiar face
Comments on Blue Guide Concise Italy
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Blue Guide Northern Italy
Comments on Blue Guide The Marche & San Marino
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A day trip to Ostia Antica from Rome - highly recommended
Comments on Blue Guide Southern Italy
Comments on Blue Guide Concise Rome
A day trip from Venice up the Brenta Canal
A day trip to Murano from Venice
Pietrasanta, Pisa: in search of Stagi
Reading list for Venice
Reading list for Florence and Tuscany
The Best Credit / Debit Card for Travel
Ruskin on Venice
Reading list for Rome
Comments on Blue Guide Greece the Mainland

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